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Business Credit Cards: What You Should Know on Their Possible Disadvantages

Having the assistance of a credit card as you are starting on a new business venture may not be absolutely necessary, but it can surely help you a lot. It does not only give you a source for funds, but it also adds organization to your cash flow and in tracking expenses. Aside from this, most business credit cards offer many perks that can be of great benefit to your business.

But as tempting as these company credit cards may sound, remember that the common error of a lot of business owners is that they do not consider the disadvantages that these credit cards may include. Many have made huge mistakes in running their finances with such business credits that have often led to personal-liability. This is why you need to know about the disadvantages and learn what you can do to either handle or prevent them from ruining your business.

What are the Drawbacks of Business Credit Cards?

What a lot of small business owners do not realize is that when they are only initially starting out on a business and have not yet established a business credit score, their professional and personal finances can be blended. This is because most credit cards require a personal liability agreement from the business owner at least for the first few years when company is just starting out.

Therefore, the business owner can be held liable for any problems with the company’s credit account. For example, if your company fails to make payments on time then this could significantly dent your personal credit score despite the fact that this is not a personal transaction.

Other possible disadvantages that business credits may have include the large possibility for employees to abuse the use of company credits by charging personal purchases. Aside from this, fewer protections may come with it as compared to a personal credit card because the intended use of these credits are for company purposes and not personal. Higher interest rates are also usually charged by business credit cards as compared to personal credit cards.

What You Can Do To Control Mismanagement of Business Credits?

Despite the possible disadvantages that credit cards may bring, remember that these things can only happen if there is a mismanagement of your credit account. What you can do is set certain precautions so as to avoid such drawbacks from happening. Remember to register your company with a business credit bureau as they can help you establish a business credit score, which will later on help you forgo with the personal-liability agreement.

Also remember to manage your company’s financial transactions well. Build a favorable credit history by making the right payments and avoid making huge debts that your business cannot afford. More importantly, when you’re only starting out, remember that it cannot be avoided for you to be personally liable to debts therefore learn to use credits wisely. It would also be helpful to take extra precautions by placing minimal credit limits for employees and reporting abuse of your company’s credit account.

Remember that business credit cards can help your company a lot, but they are not flawless and therefore one has to be smart in using them. Remember to take the extra precautions and always be careful with your finances.

Through this, when you avail a credit card for your company, you can make it work for you and allow it to become a partner in making your business grow instead of giving you liabilities.

Defining a Project Scope

The project scope is the core of an individual project. Without a project scope the project will just float. Proper needs assessments and other intricate details will be overlooked. Each project is designed to resolve issues the stakeholders are experiencing in their company. These well meaning individuals will dump data and information charts, lists and figures presumptuously on the desk expecting it to all make sense. The “here’s the problem, fix it” attitude can be frustrating. There are numerous feature requirements which must be met. It is unclear as to what to prioritize where. Cost estimates may not be accurate. Delivery dates are tentative. It is enough to make someone through up their hands in desperation and say “I QUIT!”. The trained business analyst will just grin and dive in. He or she will know what is needed is a project scope.

The project scope is the outline of the project. The project scope is considered the itinerary of an individual project program. The project scope is the step by step guide to determine who, what, why, when, and where. It will be able to define to the stakeholders what they want to have done. It will be able to list who will be doing which job. The project scope will list why each step is critical to success of the project. It will also address the time frame as to when the project should be completed.

The project scope will detail for the stakeholders outside resources being utilized for completion of individual tasks. Each development team will be able to view the project scope and see what is required of them. The project scope will also detail needs assessment and cost estimates.

Each project scope will be able to address technical constraints the stakeholders may or may not be aware of. Within the project scope a detailed report of end user requests will also be added. This will allow the stakeholders to understand why certain aspects of the project program are different than anticipated.

The project scope is an itinerary listing short term and long term expectations. Short term goals will be listed allowing the stakeholders to check each milestone. The project scope will also include a prioritized listing of essential requirements or features needed for short term and long term success of the project program.

One of the most critical reports in the project scope is the vision statement. The vision statement will define in clear and concise wording the project scope. The vision statement will allow the stakeholders to understand the problem and the solution needed. The vision statement will state the user needs in clear terms. The program features will be outlined in the vision statement.

The project scope is the “do to” list of the program. A sort of brainstorming, or in some cases, model storming which allows all parties involved to be able to follow along. Each department along with the stakeholders will be able to refer to the project scope throughout the completion of the project. Without the project scope the project has no start or end point. The project will most likely fail.

Being Flexible as a Business Analyst

Sometimes the business analyst can be so caught up in a project he or she forgets tried and true methods do not always work. The analysis team is trying to get done what the customer has scoped out and sets up a plan of action. The plan of action requires certain fundamentals. There are times when these rudimentary ideas just do not work for the client. The client can not understand why these steps may be so important. This is when the business analyst needs to step back and ask the same questions as the client. It is all in communication.

The professional business analyst must understand success of the project is not only about requirements documentations it is about how those requirements are handled. The business analyst is the acting liaison between the client and IT. The documentation may be required for the IT team to do their job. Certain explanations may be necessary for everyone to understand what is needed. Yet the client may not understand the documentation or have no need for it to begin with. Communication skills are what is required.

The business analyst may get further and move faster with just a simple meeting to explain the methods and procedures being used. The client can ask questions and the business analyst can explain. The case studies and other documentation would not in any way assure the client of progress. There are those who need to hear it because to them it may look good on paper, but how is it supposed to work? A good business analyst can explain the intricacies of what is taking place. The client can sign off. The work can continue. The goal is being met.

This is where the business analyst must be flexible. Just because he or she has done this a thousand times with other clients does not mean this client is like the other thousand. The job of the business analyst is to determine what the client wants. Paperwork may be a burden to the client. The business analyst should comprehend how information is delivered. He or she must be flexible enough to deliver what the customer is requesting. The business analyst must ensure the client is comfortable with how information is delivered. Not the other way around.

There will be times the business analyst must learn to be flexible when it comes to dealing with information. Not everyone can do the job of a business analyst. This is why he or she was hired in the first place. However, there may be no documentation for certain things the analyst is normally made privy to. The business analyst must be flexible in knowing how to work around this barrier. He or she must know how to gather the information needed to perform the task. Flexibility comes in handy at this point. The business analyst may have to do what he or she can at present and wait for statistics to be gathered. Instead of getting a concise written report from the team, the analyst may have to interview each member to gather what he or she needs.

The key is to work within the boundaries of the client. Do what the client feels comfortable with. The business analyst may not be as comfortable. Being flexible in any situation will do away with this unease. The task at hand can be accomplished.

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